11 deadly presentation sins: A path to redemption for public speakers and everyday presenters

Few things in corporate communications and PR are more important than the ability to present our ideas in clear and compelling terms. Solid presentation skills can help communications pros win new business, gain approval for programs and budgets, motivate employees and better position themselves as industry experts and leaders.

But the bar has never been higher for presenters. The average human attention span is said to be less than that of a goldfish. And TED Talks have conditioned audiences to expect to be entertained on the way to being informed.

Even professional communicators are not immune to committing “death by PowerPoint.” In this engaging and information-packed session, you’ll learn practical techniques to overcome the deadliest of presentation sins.

This session combines lessons from the worlds of business and entertainment—from Seth Godin and Steve Jobs to Star Trek and The Office—to help participants give the performance of their lives.

In this session, you’ll learn how to:

  • Analyze and understand their audience’s needs.
  • Structure and focus their content in a compelling way.
  • Use story and emotion to win hearts and change minds.
  • Develop more compelling, modern visuals.
  • Improve delivery technique to bring energy to their performance and make the most of body language.

TrackCommunication Skills
FormatTraditional
Career LevelStrategic adviser
Date and time: Tuesday, 13 June, 1:45–2:45 p.m.

Rob-Biesenbach-150x150Presenter / Rob Biesenbach / Illinois, U.S. is an independent corporate communications pro, actor, author and speaker. He is a former VP at Ogilvy PR Worldwide and press secretary to the Ohio Attorney General, and has written hundreds of speeches for CEOs and other executives. He is also a Second City-trained actor who has appeared in more than 150 stage, commercial and film productions in the past decade. Rob’s most recent book is 11 Deadly Presentation Sins, on which this presentation is based.